Stanley Woods the first generation of professional factory riders

After competing in race sprints and handicap races with his fathers Harley-Davidson motor-cycle which his father used in his business as a commercial salesman for Mackintosh toffee. It was the pre-war Rudge rider Tommy Green who Stanley Woods calls “his mentor” that encouraged him to visit the Isle of Man TT Races in 1921 with his friend C. W. ‘Paddy’ Johnston. After watching the races at Hillberry during the 1921 Isle of Man TT Races, Stanley Woods told his friends that “I can do that.”

Despite his enthusiasm for the Isle of Man TT Races, Stanley Woods was without a motor-cycle to compete in the 1922 Isle of Man TT. After writing to most of the British motor-cycle manufactures, Stanley Woods was able to persuade the Cotton motor-cycle company to provide a machine for the 1922 Junior TT Race. The Cotton marque had entered a new motor-cycle with a new overhead-valve Blackburne engine. On first meeting Stanley Woods, the Cotton racing manager exclaimed that;- “My God! They’ve sent me a bloody schoolboy!

Racing with Cotton Motorcycle Company
The Isle of Man Examiner newspaper described Stanley Woods as an “enthusiastic amateur” and started the 1922 Junior TT with the number 40 entered by Cotton. After being delayed at the start to stop to recover dropped spark-plugs which had fallen-out of his pocket,

Stanley Woods still managed to make good-time and lapped in 40 minutes and 50 seconds despite clipping the kerb at Governor’s Bridge on lap 1. At Sulby on lap 2, Stanley Woods slipped off the motor-cycle and continued but hit the same kerb again at Governor’s Bridge which removed part of the exhaust. A fire in the pits at the TT Grandstand followed which was extinguished by pit-attendants and Stanley Woods using an overcoat.

Further problems occurred at Braddan Bridge when Stanley Woods had to stop to re-place an exhaust valve after the inlet push-rod had broken. At Greeba Castle when he discovered the brakes had failed after the rear brake cam lever had split a result of the pit-fire. Although, Stanley Woods continued the 1922 Junior TT Race with no brakes, he again fell-off at the Ramsey Hairpin on the last-lap, but finished the race in 5th place in a time of 3 hours, 55 minutes and 33 seconds.

After competing in race sprints and handicap races with his fathers Harley-Davidson motor-cycle which his father used in his business as a commercial salesman for Mackintosh toffee. It was the pre-war Rudge rider Tommy Green who Stanley Woods calls “his mentor” that encouraged him to visit the Isle of Man TT Races in 1921 with his friend C. W. ‘Paddy’ Johnston. After watching the races at Hillberry during the 1921 Isle of Man TT Races, Stanley Woods told his friends that “I can do that.”

Despite his enthusiasm for the Isle of Man TT Races, Stanley Woods was without a motor-cycle to compete in the 1922 Isle of Man TT. After writing to most of the British motor-cycle manufactures, Stanley Woods was able to persuade the Cotton motor-cycle company to provide a machine for the 1922 Junior TT Race. The Cotton marque had entered a new motor-cycle with a new overhead-valve Blackburne engine. On first meeting Stanley Woods, the Cotton racing manager exclaimed that;- “My God! They’ve sent me a bloody schoolboy!

Racing with Cotton Motorcycle Company
The Isle of Man Examiner newspaper described Stanley Woods as an “enthusiastic amateur” and started the 1922 Junior TT with the number 40 entered by Cotton. After being delayed at the start to stop to recover dropped spark-plugs which had fallen-out of his pocket,

Stanley Woods still managed to make good-time and lapped in 40 minutes and 50 seconds despite clipping the kerb at Governor’s Bridge on lap 1. At Sulby on lap 2, Stanley Woods slipped off the motor-cycle and continued but hit the same kerb again at Governor’s Bridge which removed part of the exhaust. A fire in the pits at the TT Grandstand followed which was extinguished by pit-attendants and Stanley Woods using an overcoat.

Further problems occurred at Braddan Bridge when Stanley Woods had to stop to re-place an exhaust valve after the inlet push-rod had broken. At Greeba Castle when he discovered the brakes had failed after the rear brake cam lever had split a result of the pit-fire. Although, Stanley Woods continued the 1922 Junior TT Race with no brakes, he again fell-off at the Ramsey Hairpin on the last-lap, but finished the race in 5th place in a time of 3 hours, 55 minutes and 33 seconds.